HR & Career
Top stories summarized by our editors
5/22/2018

Stick to the plans you make with your colleagues, and find time to interact with the new person in the office, writes entrepreneur Michael Volkmann. Show appreciation to co-workers who help you with a project by offering to help them with a task or treat them to a coffee.

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Lifehacker
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Michael Volkmann
5/22/2018

Takeda Pharmaceutical made the transition to a global HR system three years ago, combining organizational processes into a single global platform, says Ana Cardoso, a vice president of HR. "Ultimately, the question is how do we match our business aspirations to our employee value proposition, because the people are really what makes a difference to our business," Cardoso says.

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HRM Asia (Singapore)
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Takeda Pharmaceutical
5/22/2018

C-suite executives should take the lead in changing workplace cultures that allow sexual harassment, former HR leaders for Apple and Netflix say. In addition, employers should have a plan that trains employees and managers, empowers them to act and holds everyone accountable for their actions, write Rebecca Blake and Nancy Saperstone of OneDigital.

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CNBC, Workforce online
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Apple, Netflix
5/22/2018

Employers using artificial intelligence should develop a workplace culture that welcomes creativity and gives teams the authority to solve problems, writes Alberto Loyola, managing director of Ignite Organizations. "Successful leaders will communicate properly the impact of AI in the workplace and address how work would change and what every employee's role will be," Loyola writes.

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Alberto Loyola
5/22/2018

Companies undergoing organizational transformation can use people analytics to reach their goals, write Chantrelle Nielsen and Natalie McCullough of Microsoft. Analytics can measure company activities, track resources and identify ways to improve employee feedback.

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Microsoft
5/22/2018

Many company rewards programs fail to impress employees, a Bersin by Deloitte study says. Successful programs align rewards with business goals and should consider offering flexible work schedules and lower health care premiums, HR leaders say.

5/22/2018

Support mental health in the workplace by talking about it openly, setting policies to protect and accommodate employees and offering wellness programs, writes Michelle Jackson of Unum. "While technology and our always-on culture make it hard to disconnect, encourage employees to set device-off times so they can fully recharge before the next day," Jackson writes.

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Workforce online
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Michelle Jackson
5/22/2018

HR can make new parents' transitions back to work easier by keeping in contact with them while they're on leave and allowing them to work part time before resuming a full-time schedule, writes Gretchen Van Vlymen, HR head at StratEx. "The company needs to be equipped with accommodations that are legally required -- like a place to express breast milk -- and those that are 'nice to have' such as flex time, on-site daycare, dependent-care benefits or work from home arrangements," she writes.

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Workforce online
5/22/2018

Have an understanding of the company or other party before you begin negotiations, and go in with a positive and confident mindset, Deep Patel writes. Be aware of your own strengths and weaknesses, listen to the other party's priorities, then be sure to outline your own priorities to create a "win-win" situation.

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Entrepreneur online
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Deep Patel
5/22/2018

Hiring managers get an overwhelming amount of resumes for every job posting, given the proliferation of job boards and relative ease of applying, executive recruiter Jack Kelly writes. Instead of spending a lot of time perfecting your resume, tailor it to the job you're applying for to show that you would be a perfect fit, and clearly show that you have the relevant skills and experience.

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Forbes
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Jack Kelly